Twittering Tales #127 – 12 March 2019

Photo by Pexel2013 at Pixabay.com

What a sight, even on a dark wet night like this. The express pulled in to the station .The hiss as she braked was deafening. Mason scanned the passengers as they disembarked filling the place with bustle. Then he saw her smile, Emerald. Everything else just
disappeared.
(279 Characters)

This  is my  entry for Kat Myrman of Like Mercury Colliding Twittering Tales 

Stream Of Consciouness Saturday

When I was s little girl I loved , what was to me exotic fruit, that we only had at Christmas.

To me the most exciting and tasty was the date. Now there was not the choice we have today we always had  the  common  date  from  the  date  palm the Delget  Nour  which  looked  like  these.

box-of-eat-me-dates-apmp6f

Image  from here

Now  these  dates  have a  long  narrow  stone  with   an O in the  middle  of it. Probably  this O is  to do  with  the  stem or  the  stork   and how the  fruit  grows on  the palm. That  is  the  logical  and  scientific answer   but  my  father  told  me  a story  when I  was  little  and I  prefer  to  believe  what he told me.

date_stones_closeup

Image  from  here

If  you look  closely  at  the  dates stones in  the the photo  you  will see  that  those which are  placed  the right  way up  you can see  the O .

Well back  to the  story  that  Dad  told  me. “When Mary  and Joseph had  to  travel  from  Nazareth  to   Bethlehem Mary had a craving  for  something sweet. She  told  Joseph  and  he  was  dismayed to have to  tell here  there  was nothing he  could give  her.  They  moved on a  little  way  and   came  to  some  date trees. Joseph  picked  some dates  for Mary  and  she  delightedly  said  Oh!  because  they  were  moist and sweet! Just  what she wanted! ” So  my  Dad told  me that  was  the  reason  there is always  an O  on  the  stone  of  the date.

Well I love  my  Dad’s story  and I told it  to  all my  children  and  if  I  ever  get  the chance  I  shall  tell  my  grandson  too!

joseph-mary-bethlehemmangerdonkey

Image  from here

This is  part LindaGHill‘s Stream of Consciousness Saturday.This  week  Linda’s prompt  was  :Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is: “date.” Use it any way you’d like. Have fun!

Rules  and Pingback  here

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Haiku to the Passion Flower.

Hi  to one  and all today  has  been  very  busy  and tomorrow  looks  to be  busy too as  we are  off to visit  the Newbie! I have been so rushed since  Wednesday  that I have not  managed  to publish  so  tonight I am going  to publish  a Haiku  with  an explanation  and hope  that  will suffice.

In  my  defense I have  been  editing  us all a treat for Sunday, Wink  and Bow  to Paul

~~~~~

Passion Flower

Passion Flower

Crown of thorns, nails, cross of wood

He died for man’s good.

Flower tells his tale of passion.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A piece of exquisite yet passing beauty, it comes from a bell-shaped bud to open and live for only one day and then succumb to its fading death in the same bell-shaped form. The tropical vine it grows on is lavished with multiple flowers and draws one’s attention immediately by the flower’s perfect shape and hidden mystery. The colors vary from deep purple (the color of Orthodox priests’ vestments during the Great Lent) to scarlet red, yet the numerical constituents remain the same: 10 petals (5 petals and 5 sepals identical in shape and color), 1 column, 72 corona filaments, 5 anthers, 3 stigmas.

Let’s decipher the numbers above according to Biblical story of Passions:

10 – Biblical account of Christ’s suffering tells us about St. Peter who distanced himself from Christ during His last hours, neither was Judas; whereas, 10 is the number of remaining Disciples of Christ at the time of crucifixion;

1 – Column of flagellation;

72 – Traditional number of thorns on a crown of thorns set upon Christ’s head;

5 – Total number of wounds inflicted to Christ at time of crucifixion;

3 – Nails.

Additionally, the vine’s leaves are shaped like a spear used to pierce Christ’s side. Some even find representation to Judas’ 30 pieces of silver (dark round spots on the underside of some species). Ominous may it seem to some or not, this flower graciously and quietly speaks of the most inspiring, life-changing and soul-bending story ever told to mankind.

I got  my  information  from  here  , I just  could  not explain as well as  the article. The  photos  were  taken by  me though.

Passion Flower

Passion Flower

Musical Themes : Myths

Irish Goddess Macha

Macha (Irish pronunciation: [ˈmaxə]) is a goddess of ancient Ireland, associated
with war, horses, sovereignty, and the sites of Armagh and Eamhain Mhacha in County Armagh,
which are named after her. A number of figures called Macha appear in Irish mythology, legend
and historical tradition, all believed to derive from the same deity. The name is presumably
derived from Proto-Celtic *makajā denoting “a plain” (genitive *makajās “of the plain”). rea more on Wiki

APOTHEOSES – Angels of Mons :

During World War One there was a widespread belief
in Britain that some form of supernatural intervention saved allied troops during
the retreat from Mons. Since the war this event, generally known as the “Angel of Mons”
has been variously used as evidence of supernatural intervention in combat, an example
of a collective hallucination or as an urban myth unwittingly originated by a piece of fiction.
The most prosaic explanation is that the Angel was no more than a misinterpretation of odd cloud
formations seen by weary troops. The only thing that most theories agree on is that something strange
happened during the retreat from Mons in August 1914 and that this was witnessed by British
(and possibly German) troops. However, a re-reading of the evidence puts even this most basic point of
convergence in doubt and raises the possibility that the story of the Angel owes more to military expedience
than divine providence. Read more

Thomas the Rhymer Steele Eye Span

Do you believe in fairies? The inhabitants of the Borders at the time of the Border ballads did …

 Thomas of Ercildoune lived in the Borders hundreds of years ago. One day, as he sat beneath the Eildon Tree near Melrose,

he heard the tinkling of silver bells and the sound of a horse’s hooves. The beautiful Queen of Elfland rode by on a white horse.

Thomas fell under her spell and journeyed deep within the hollow Eildon Hills to the ‘Fairy Otherworld’. There, Thomas was given

the gift of prophesy.

When he returned to the mortal world he found that he had certain gifts: he was unable to tell a lie and became known as

‘True Thomas’; he could foresee the future and foretold the death of King Alexander III;

some even say that Thomas became immortal and still lives gathering horses for the sleeping knights that rest deep within the hollow hills.

Learn more 

Donovan Atlantis

Atlantis (Ancient Greek: Ἀτλαντὶς νῆσος, “island of Atlas“) is a legendary island first mentioned in Plato‘s dialogues Timaeus and Critias, written in c. 360 BC. According to Plato, Atlantis was a naval power lying “across the Pillars of Hercules” that conquered many parts of Western Europe and Africa 9,000 years before the time of the legendary Athenian lawgiver Solon, i.e. in the 10th millennium BC. After a failed attempt to invade Athens, Atlantis sank into the ocean “in a single day and night of misfortune.”

The possible existence of Atlantis was discussed throughout classical antiquity, but it was usually rejected and occasionally parodied by later authors. Alan Cameron wrote: “It is only in modern times that people have taken the Atlantis story seriously; no one did so in antiquity”.[1] The Timaeus remained known in a Latinrendition by Calcidius through the Middle Ages, and the allegorical aspect of Atlantis was taken up byHumanists in utopian works of several Renaissance writers, such as Bacon‘s New Atlantis and More‘s Utopia. In the United StatesDonnelly‘s 1882 publication Atlantis: the Antediluvian World unleashed widespread interests from pseudo-scientists. As a theme, Atlantis inspires today’s light fiction, from science fiction to comic books to films. Its name has become a byword for any and all supposed advanced prehistoric lost civilizations.

Read more 

Unicorn The Irish Rovers

The unicorn is a legendary animal that has been described since antiquity as a beast with a large, pointed, spiraling horn

projecting from its forehead. The unicorn was depicted in ancient seals of the Indus Valley Civilization and was mentioned

by theancient Greeks in accounts of natural history by various writers, including CtesiasStraboPliny the Younger, and Aelian.

TheBible also describes an animal, the re’em, which some translations have rendered with the word unicorn.

In European folklore, the unicorn is often depicted as a white horselike or goatlike animal with a long horn and cloven hooves

(sometimes a goat’s beard). In the Middle Ages and Renaissance, it was commonly described as an extremely wild woodland creature,

a symbol of purity and grace, which could only be captured by a virgin. In the encyclopedias its horn was said to have the power to render

poisoned water potable and to heal sickness. In medieval and Renaissance times, the horn of the narwhal was sometimes sold as unicorn horn.

Learn more 

David Arkenstone The Dragons breath

dragon is a legendary creature, typically with serpentine or reptilian traits, that features in the myths of many cultures.

There are two distinct cultural traditions of dragons: the European dragon, derived from European folk traditions and ultimately

related to Greek and Middle Eastern mythologies, and the Chinese dragon, with counterparts in Japan, Korea and other East Asian countries.

The two traditions may have evolved separately, but have influenced each other to a certain extent, particularly with the cross-cultural contact

of recent centuries. The English word “dragon” derives from Greek δράκων (drákōn), “dragon, serpent of huge size, water-snake”. 

Learn more

The Herd From the Underworld

In Greek mythology, the Minotaur (/ˈmnətɔː/,[1] /ˈmɪnəˌtɔr/;[2] Ancient Greek: Μῑνώταυρος [miːnɔ̌ːtau̯ros]Latin:

Minotaurus,Etruscan Θevrumineś), was a creature with the head of a bull on the body of a man[3] or, as described by Roman poet Ovid, ”

part man and part bull”.  He dwelt at the center of the Cretan Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze-like construction designed by the architect

Daedalus and his son Icarus, on the command of King Minos of Crete. The Minotaur was eventually killed by the Athenian hero Theseus.

The term Minotaur derives from the Ancient Greek Μῑνώταυρος, a compound of the name Μίνως (Minos) and the noun ταύρος”bull”,

translated as “(the) Bull of Minos”. In Crete, the Minotaur was known by its proper name, Asterion,[6] a name shared with Minos’ foster-father.[7]

“Minotaur” was originally a proper noun in reference to this mythical figure. The use of “minotaur” as a common noun to refer to members

of a generic race of bull-headed creatures developed much later, in 20th-century fantasy genre fiction.

Warewolves of London Warren Zevon

Werewolf myths have been around perhaps even longer than those associated with vampires and zombies.

Ancient Greek mythology tells of Lycaon, a man transformed into a wolf after eating human flesh.

The word werewolf is thought to be derived from the Old English “wer,” meaning man. While the specific attributes

of werewolves vary across different cultures, the beast itself is generally the same: a part-man, part-wolf creature of the

night who preys on humans. But just as with vampires and zombies, most of the myths surrounding werewolves do not hold up to scrutiny.

Learn more

Celtic woman Fairies

fairy (also fayfae; from faeryfaerie, “realm of the fays“) is a type of mythical being or legendary creature

in European folklore, a form of spirit, often described as metaphysicalsupernatural or preternatural.

Fairies resemble various beings of other mythologies, though even folklore that uses the term fairy offers

many definitions. Sometimes the term describes any magical creature, includinggoblins or gnomes:

at other times, the term only describes a specific type of more ethereal creature or sprite.

Various folkloristic traditions refer to them euphemistically, by names such as wee folkgood folkpeople of peacefair folk

Learn more 

Mermaid song ~ Sarah Khider (with lyrics)

mermaid is a legendary aquatic creature with the upper body of a female human and the tail of a fish.

Mermaids appear in the folklore of many cultures worldwide, including the Near East, Europe, Africa and Asia.

The first stories appeared in ancientAssyria, in which the goddess Atargatis transformed herself into a mermaid

out of shame for accidentally killing her human lover. Mermaids are sometimes associated with perilous events

such as floods, storms, shipwrecks and drownings. In other folk traditions (or sometimes within the same tradition),

they can be benevolent or beneficent, bestowing boons or falling in love with humans.

Learn more 

Loreena McKennitt the old ways

Wicca (English pronunciation: /ˈwɪkə/) is a modern paganwitchcraft religion. It was developed in England

during the first half of the 20th century and it was introduced to the public in 1954 by Gerald Gardner,

a retired British civil servant. It draws upon a diverse set of ancient pagan and 20th century hermetic motifs

for its theological structure and ritual practice. The word witchderives from Middle English wiccheOld English wicce

(/ˈwɪttʃe/) (feminine) “witch” and wicca (/ˈwɪttʃɑ/) (masculine) “wizzard”.

Wicca is a diverse religion with no central authority or figure defining it. It is divided into various lineages and denominations,

referred to as traditions, each with its own organisational structure and level of centralisation. Due to its decentralized nature,

there is some disagreement over what actually constitutes Wicca. Some traditions, collectively referred to as British Traditional Wicca, strictly follow the initiatory lineage of Gardner and consider the term Wicca to apply only to such lineaged traditions, while other eclectic traditions do not.

Learn more 

King Arthur is a legendary British leader of the late 5th and early 6th centuries, who, according to medieval

histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the early 6th century.

The details of Arthur’s story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence

is debated and disputed by modern historians. The sparse historical background of Arthur is gleaned from

various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas.

Arthur’s name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin.

Learn more

Don’t forget to check out   http://bearspawprint.wordpress.com/        http://47whitebuffalo.wordpress.com/   http://johnnyojanpera.wordpress.com/  and not forgetting http://myriad234.wordpress.com/

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