Stream of Consciousness Saturday:Remember the women left back home.

This  is part of LindGHill‘s Stream of Consciousness Saturday. Linda said

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is: “mem.” Choose a word or words with the letters “mem” in that order and run with it. Enjoy!”

As  the  prompt  this  week   is  “mem” and  as  tomorrow  is  official  Remembrance Sunday  here in  the UK . I  thought I  would  remember  the  women  for  WW1  and  WW2 who  took over  all  the  jobs  that the  men  who  had  been  sent  off  to  war  left  empty here in what  was  known then as  Great  Britain.

Not  only  did  the  women  do  these  , sometimes  very  dangerous  jobs,but  they  looked after  the families  and  homes. Now  I  do  not  wish in  any  way  to  detract  from  the huge  sacrifice  of  all the  men  who  fought  for  our countries during  the  two  wars .

Please  forgive  any  mistakes  as it  is  SoCs  I  had  no  time  to  research  or  prepare.

d8552036f3202261b6105c6ce5442594

Remember the women left back home.

They made the ammunition for Tommy

Dangerous work,they died too it was not funny.

Women became officers of the law

Something never heard of before.

 

Nurses, drivers  even pilots for planes

Remember  them  we  will never  know  their  names

Someone had to give  the  farmers a hand

Remember   the men  were  at war  in a  foreign  land.

 

The members  of  the ” fairer  sex ”

Drove  the  buses, trains  and  lorries

Kept  all essential job going ,however  complex

They  also  fed  the family  and kept  the Home Fires  Burning

twr_crop__homeb1_iwm-q30040-shell-factory-uk-40-iwm_ipad

 

During  the  wars ww1 and  ww2  women filled  in the  gaps  that  the  men  who  had  been sent  off  to  war  left. It  is  not  always  remembered  that  they, worked in  the factorys  drove  buses , trains and flew  planes and  probably  sailed  ships.  They  became  members  of  the  forces, nurses at  home  and on the  war  front  too. They  were  also  seconded into  the police  these  jobs  were almost unheard of  for  women before  the  first  world war. They  also  had  to do hard  farm labour  on  the farms to help keep  the  food  supplies  going.

Women worked in  shipyards, built  planes  and  also  made  ammunition, hard  and  dangerous  work.

It  was not just  the   fact  that the  bombs , shells or  landmines  could  explode  if  mishandled  but  the  TNT  was  dangerous  to  the  women’s  health.

” Munitions workers whose job was filling shells were prone to suffer from TNT poisoning. TNT stood for Trinitrotoluene – an explosive which turned the skin yellow of those who regularly came into contact with it. The munitions workers who were affected by this were commonly known as ‘canaries’ due to their bright yellow appearance. Although the visible effects usually wore off, some women died from working with TNT, if they were exposed to it for a prolonged period. As Ethel Dean, who worked at Woolwich Arsenal, recalled, ‘Everything that that powder touches goes yellow. All the girls’ faces were yellow, all round their mouths. They had their own canteen, in which everything was yellow that they touched… Everything they touched went yellow – chairs, tables, everything.’ (IWM SR 9439) More  imformation  here

Women did  so many  jobs that  before  the  first  world  war, those of  the middle  and  higher class would  never  even  contemplated. Many  died of  injury  and  of  disease  due  to  chemicals,  asbestos  used in  badly  ventilated  buildings.

Also  they played  their  part in  SOE   read here   and also  here  .

worldwar_2727016c

 

womenswork6

 

world-war-two-these-four-women-of-the-waaf-the-women-s-auxiliary-air-b3p4r0

women_at_work_during_the_first_world_war_q28345

5574414-3x2-940x627

cloaks

All images  from  Google Images  women  at  war  ww1 and  ww2

Rules  and Pingback here


Advertisements

11 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Ritu
    Nov 12, 2016 @ 18:22:45

    Lovely sentiment Willow. It’s so important to remember all those who served their countries in ALL ways.

    Reply

  2. Judy E Martin
    Nov 12, 2016 @ 18:48:18

    Thank you for highlighting all that the women did during the war, too Willow. So many people played a huge part in different ways :xxx

    Reply

  3. Let's CUT the Crap!
    Nov 12, 2016 @ 20:25:16

    Wow. You’ve offered up a lot of information here. Thank you. A lot of this we don’t think about and I found it an enlightening read. ❤ 🙂

    Reply

    • willowdot21
      Nov 12, 2016 @ 20:38:07

      Hi Tess, I am so glad you enjoyed this, it is amazing what the women of this country ( I am sure women in other countries did their bit too) but this is what I knew about. The women carried the country through both wars, and kept their families together, fed and clothed too. I did this post as a stream of consciousness post so I could not prepare but the links are interesting. When I was a child we had a lovely old lady as a neighbour, her name was grace. She would of been a beauty in her youth. She worked in the ammunition factories during both world wars. She survived but she had lots of amazing tales to tell.Thank yo for reading Tess. ❤ ❤

      Reply

  4. John Holton
    Nov 13, 2016 @ 22:29:55

    Looking at it now, a lot of deaths related to TNT exposure could have been avoided with protective clothing and procedures designed to sanitize the women who had been working with it, in much the same way that deaths from asbestos exposure could have been prevented. I guess they never considered that back then.

    Excellent post!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trent's World (the Blog)

Random Ramblings and Reviews from Trent P. McDonald

My Dad Is A Goldfish

Caring for a demented dad

Book 'Em, Jan O

Ghosts, Tall Tales & Witty Haiku!

Life is too short to drink bad wine

La vie est trop courte pour boire du mauvais vin

beyondtheflow

A Survivor's Philosophy of Life

Mick E Talbot Poems

haiku tanka senryu hiabun, all manner of poetry.

Deb's World

The world according to Debbie

Suzie Speaks

The Adventures Of a Thirty-Something Life

🌼Colleen Chesebro Fairy Whisperer 🌼

YA Fantasy Novelist, Poet, & Visual Word Artist

Shelley Wilson

I Write. I Read. I Review

Morpethroad

Random meaningful words on a page

But I Smile Anyway...

Musings and memories, words and wisdom... of a working family woman

Her Headache

A place to express myself through writing. a way to make sense of it all. Life as I see it.

sameernayan

Arts, Video & Photography

KTSW 89.9

The Other Side of Radio

SaylingAway

Shorts, Novels, and Other Things

TanGental

Writing, the Universe and whatever occurs to me

A Grateful Man

To remind you about the goodness and greatness within yourself and others.

A Dog's Life? (Stories of me and him)

Life with Ray - 75lbs of Attitude in a Fur Coat!

Lorraine's frilly freudian slip

life in the bipolarsphere

Reena Saxena

Founder of ReInventions -- Coach, Trainer, Writer and Personal Branding Consultant

Paul Militaru

Photography Portfolio

willowdot21

An insight to a heart mind and soul.

This Thing Called Life One Word at a Time

"Never forget it is real people who live out such tales and bear the price of the telling, in grief and guilt and sorrow". -Jacqueline Carey

Linda G. Hill

Life in progress

Diary of an Internet Nobody.

Rants and Musings from the Ether.

Norm 2.0

Photography, fiction, opinions and reviews, and whatever else I feel like posting

trainofthought

from stop to stop, a journey in thought

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

Echoes of Life, Love and Laughter

deletedangel

Lost Poetry

Everything I Never Told You

Lucidly in shadows. Poetry from a hand that writes misty.

Ellenbest24

words and scribble.

%d bloggers like this: